?

Log in

No account? Create an account

The rom-com layout & font - The online computery journal thingy of a turtle

May. 8th, 2010

12:51 am - The rom-com layout & font

Previous Entry Share Next Entry

Julie & Julia

Something's Gotta Give

EDIT: The Holiday

Behold, the standard rom-com DVD cover layout!

-Top third, bottom third: Photos of the stars.
-Middle third: Film title, set in BodoniDidot.

Didot is the rom-com font, just as Trajan is the serious movie font and Gill Sans Ultra is the funny movie font.

Comments:

[User Picture]
From:athelind
Date:May 8th, 2010 03:27 am (UTC)
(Link)
Another required element appears to be a giant, overly-ornate ampersand!
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:kinkyturtle
Date:May 8th, 2010 06:13 am (UTC)
(Link)
So it does!
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:kinkyturtle
Date:May 9th, 2010 05:04 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Except "The Holiday" doesn't have one. I guess it's optional.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:ceruleanst
Date:May 8th, 2010 08:31 am (UTC)
(Link)
Gill is a prominent variant choice, but the standard for dumb funny movies in general is Futura Extra Black. Gill gets used a bit more for "family" fare. Just so long as it's red...
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:kinkyturtle
Date:May 8th, 2010 12:53 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Huh. Futura Extra Black looks nothing like Futura Black, which suggests less "dumb funny" and more "blaxploitation". :}
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:ceruleanst
Date:May 8th, 2010 01:29 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Yes, the naming of Futura Black and Futura Display to include them in the Futura family is one of those odd quirks of history. Some foundries have even slipped up and given the name of Futura Black to their cut of Futura Extra Bold (as normally these two weight terms tend to be interchangeable) and caused no end of confusion.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
From:oniomancer
Date:May 9th, 2010 10:23 am (UTC)
(Link)
So it probably wouldn't be an appropriate font for the upcoming Creature From The Black Lagoon remake?
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:deckardcanine
Date:May 8th, 2010 05:41 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I think people who complain about overused fonts need to sort out their priorities, especially those who skip resumes in TNR.

But I do take interest in movie poster cues. Last month my dad pointed out two consecutive posters, one for Babies and one for Oceans, done in almost exactly the same style by different companies. Must be a documentary thing.

And you've probably discovered by now that when a poster shows people against a plain white background, it's always a comedy. Well, as long as the people are photographed or, in the case of animations, shown in their usual style. If there's a non-comical drawing to advertise a non-animation, it may be a non-comedy.

I have to wonder what it is about these tricks that affect us subconsciously. Maybe it's just our internalization of the norm, or maybe it's something more visceral. A lack of background does tend to suggest a low budget, which describes most comedies....
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:tracerj
Date:May 8th, 2010 11:21 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I think people who complain about overused fonts need to sort out their priorities, especially those who skip resumes in TNR.

This is actually an interesting point. Designers were trying to bitch about the subtitles in Avatar being set in Papyrus. Firstly... it's not a bad typeface, just one that's used a ton by amateurs because it's easily had. Secondly... if you're watching Avatar, it's for blue catpeople, not quality dialogue or plot. To hell with the subtitles.

More seriously, I can have my priorities straight and still have a pretty good idea of bad design. Generally, this isn't as much about overused type – if it were, I could never look at Helvetica, Garamond, or Futura again, no matter the context! – but the design in which it appears. When I see somebody useing a highly respectable type (let's take Futura!) in a really broken way (that 'A' and 'V' have a gap wide enough to drive an 'I' though!) in a context that certainly demanded better (the logo for a large chain of coffeehouses or something), that's when I start to wonder. It's just that... yes, certain fonts indicate that the designer wasn't even trying. They're groaners, the equivalent of "$NUMBER $PEOPLE walked into a bar" jokes. The context has to be brilliant for them to actually sing.

I'm a designer. This is my priority. *grin*
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:octan
Date:May 9th, 2010 01:11 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Ugh, Papyrus for subtitles? I wouldn't use any display font for something like that. They're supposed to be simple and maximized for readability. And I don't even want to think about how it would look on DVD, where subtitles are uber-pixelated to save space.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:kinkyturtle
Date:May 9th, 2010 04:39 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Yeah. Am I right in thinking that when most designers say "OMG, I can't believe they used *that* font, I'm going to lose my lunch", what they really mean, in a tongue-in-cheek way, is "Heh, I can't believe someone got paid for that; I'd have gotten an F for that in my design class"?
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:joeygatorman
Date:May 9th, 2010 12:44 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Hello, Kinky!

Actually, the rom-com font is known as Didot, named after the 18th-19th century French typographer. Until last year The Washington Post used the Headline variety for its section titles. I loved the typeface back then and was curious as to what it was.

http://new.myfonts.com/fonts/linotype/didot/

Edited at 2010-05-09 04:45 pm (UTC)
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:kinkyturtle
Date:May 9th, 2010 04:37 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Ah, I see. Well, it is similar to Bodoni. :}
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)