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T'hhheh... ghrrromvfmaaahng... - The online computery journal thingy of a turtle

Mar. 25th, 2009

10:43 pm - T'hhheh... ghrrromvfmaaahng...

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There's an arts organization in Houston called Da Camera, which puts on concerts of classical music and jazz. I got an ad in the mail today for their latest program, called The Romantic Spirit. The funny thing about it is the typesetting; they've spelled out the title with flourishes on the letters that make them look like phonetic symbols; it looks like "Tɦɛ Roɱɑŋtiɕ ʂƥıɽit" (except the S is full height and the hook on the p goes the other way, but those don't seem to exist in Lucida Sans Unicode).

Interpreting these letters as International Phonetic Alphabet symbols, they'd be pronounced as follows:

T Not in IPA. Suggest reading as 't'.
ɦ Voiced version of 'h', like an audible sigh.
ɛ Short e as in "bell".
R Small version of capital R exists in IPA, pronounced as a sort of rasp deep in the throat.
o Long o as in "stone".
ɱ Labiodental nasal. Put your upper teeth on your lower lip as if saying 'f' and hum. Something like the 'n' in "information" said with slurred speech.
ɑ Like 'a' in "father".
ŋ Like 'ng' in "sing".
t Like 't' in "stop".
i A long 'e' sound, like 'i' in "machine".
ɕ Palatalized (raised tongue) version of 'sh'. Say "quiche" and try to sound all foreign and fancy.
ʂ Retroflex s. Say 's' with the tip of your tongue curled back towards the roof of your mouth.
ƥ Not in IPA. According to Wikipedia, this is used in some African languages, but I can't find much about how to pronounce it. Possibly an implosive, which means air is sucked into the mouth instead of expelled.
ı Not in IPA, but used in Turkish for a close back unrounded vowel. Hold your tongue as if to say 'oo', but don't purse your lips.
ɽ Retroflex r. Say 'r' as in Spanish "pero" with the tip of your tongue curled back towards the roof of your mouth.
i A long 'e' sound, like 'i' in "machine".
t Like 't' in "stop".

Now... put it all together and try to say this mess! :}

Current Mood: amusedamused

Comments:

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From:nefaria
Date:March 26th, 2009 11:19 am (UTC)
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> Possibly an implosive
You're just trying to make me implode.
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From:deckardcanine
Date:March 26th, 2009 02:06 pm (UTC)
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The only sounds I know to be in some African languages and no European languages are clicks.
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From:q_pheevr
Date:March 26th, 2009 03:17 pm (UTC)
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ƥ Not in IPA. According to Wikipedia, this is used in some African languages, but I can't find much about how to pronounce it. Possibly an implosive, which means air is sucked into the mouth instead of expelled.

Formerly the symbol for a voiceless bilabial implosive (just as you'd expect); withdrawn from the IPA in 1993. (I don't know of any languages that have voiceless implosives.)

ı Not in IPA, but used in Turkish for a close back unrounded vowel.

I've often seen this used in place of ɪ in phonetic transcriptions. Not IPA, to be sure, but an understandable substitution, particularly given that the IPA used to use ι for the sound now represented by ɪ.

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From:kinkyturtle
Date:March 26th, 2009 06:49 pm (UTC)
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Perhaps I should mention the symbol now used for the ı sound: ɯ, a turned m, which looks like if u and w got together and had a kid. :}
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From:q_pheevr
Date:March 26th, 2009 07:40 pm (UTC)
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I've often thought that if English had had the good sense to call w "double v" (as various other European languages do), then we could use "double u" to refer to ɯ. I chide my native language for its lack of foresight.

Also, now that I've had a look at the original, I'm inclined to think that the ı is not really intended qua ı, per se, but rather that it's part of a sort of vertical ligature in which the knosp at the end of the tail of the ŋ is to be interpreted, in a haplological sort of way, as subsuming the dot of the i, in the same way that the curved top of the f subsumes the dot of the i in fi (at least in some faces; ymmv). The other two instances of i are just plain i, and that peculiar left-hook p —I don't think there's a Unicode code for left-hook p; it's in Pullum and Ladusaw's Phonetic Symbol Guide, but I don't know what it's used for, since I don't have a copy to hand and Google Books won't show me page 153— suggests that the logo was hand-designed, rather than set in a pre-existing font, so I think the ı can be taken as a specifically positional allograph of i, rather than a(n even stylistically) distinct grapheme.

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From:kinkyturtle
Date:March 27th, 2009 02:09 am (UTC)
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Yeah, but interpreting it as ı is more fun!
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